Monday, August 18, 2014

The Princess and the Pea

One of Hans Christian Anderson's most popular fairy tales is called "The Princess and the Pea."  It involves a young girl who discovers that she is actually a princess, because she can't get a good night's sleep! Although she's lying on a pile of twenty mattresses and feather beds, something is digging into her soft flesh (the mark of a princess, apparently), and in the morning she's sore and bruised.  It transpires that her hostess, the mother of a bachelor prince, has placed a single pea under all the mattresses, to test the girl's sensitivity.  And, despite all the comfort and padding of the mattresses, the girl can't rest without aching and suffering.

But doesn't it seem that, although you're probably not a princess or a prince, the story is really your story, and mine?

Most of us, over a certain age, have experienced something similar to the princess' problem.  When we're young, we can sleep on the floor, or in the back seat of a car.  But as we get older, a single wrinkle in our pajamas, or a crooked crease in a sheet, or a lumpy pillow make it impossible for us to get comfortable and rest. We toss and turn and thrash until the problem is corrected.


But there's something much more important in this little story than the inability to get a good night's sleep.  We all know about the big, important crises and problems that disrupt our lives, or interfere with our fellowship with Jesus Christ - - - or, sometimes, keep people from coming to Christ in the first place.  But a man or woman can also be kept from receiving Christ, according to John 1:12, by something very small; and a Christian can be thrown off his or her spiritual stride by something so apparently insignificant that it's hardly considered a problem at all.

We all know about the big problems, and the big temptations.  Most genuine Christians will think twice about cheating on their taxes, or cursing, or committing fornication or adultery.  I'm not putting these sins on a par, but they're all obvious things that we know we must avoid.  But what about the "little" things that we all have in our lives, that displease the Lord, and impede our fellowship with Him?

I'm not talking about chronic, "besetting sins."  (I'll talk about that in another post.)  I'm talking about things that seem so insignificant that we scarcely consider them.

What do you do with your money?  I'm not talking about tithing, or how much you give to the Lord's work: that's between you and God (and nobody else, including the preacher). I'm talking about what you do with the money that's left over.  We all look at a deadbeat dad, or a welfare chiseler, and say that they're irresponsible: but how responsible are you with your money?  A man buys a tool that he really doesn't need; we've all done that.  A woman spends just a little too much on a dress (or, in this economy, a dress pattern); that's to be expected.  A young man (or an older man) goes out to buy the latest DVD or video game; okay.  The question is, do you do these things habitually?  Has appearance, or entertainment, or acquisitiveness gotten a hold on you, so that these things are a regular part of your life?  We all overeat or oversleep at times; but do you do it habitually?  Is it the norm for you? A man works late at the office because he's under a hard deadline; that's fine.  But when he makes a habit of spending more time there than he's expected to, by choice, and his family suffers from his repeated absence....

None of these things are big, dramatic sins, although the Bible doesn't exactly endorse them, either.  "Whatsoever is not of faith is sin," says Romans 14:23; and "All unrighteousness is sin" (1 John 5:17).  But even though they're not "big" sins, or obvious sins, they can get underneath the mattress like a pea, and disturb our spiritual rest in the Lord - - - or worse, keep us from coming to Him at all.  If we have "little" areas in our life that are not committed to God on a daily basis, those areas can grow and occupy us until they crowd out the Lord, or at least our desire for the Lord.

"In all thy ways acknowledge him, and he shall direct thy paths," Proverbs 3:6.  In the big, important things, like choosing a mate or finding a church?  No, in everything.  Do you know what "all thy ways" means in the "original Hebrew?"  It means "all thy ways."

You want to buy a certain dress, or watch a football game, or eat a candy bar?  Fine; the Bible doesn't condemn those things - - - as long as you've committed them to the Lord.  If He approves, enjoy yourself!  If He whispers "No, I don't like that," you'd better not do it.  You might find a pea under your mattress, and the Lord's guidance in your life will be gone.

It's not the hippopotamus or the elephant who stomps all over the vineyard.  It's the little foxes that spoil the grapes (Song of Solomon 2:15).

Fellowship with the Lord, and guidance from the Lord, and rest in the Lord, are very precious; most of the world's people don't know these joys.  Don't let the little foxes spoil them.  Don't put a pea under your mattress!


Thursday, August 14, 2014

ISIS Threatening Saeed's Life

For some time, this blog has been extremely concerned about the situation facing Saeed Abedini, the Iranian-born American pastor being held in captivity in Iran.  Despite the protests of millions of Christians, and the efforts of many nations (although those of the U.S. State Department have been feckless and few), the Mohammedan beasts who have made Saeed's life about as close to Hell as one can get on this earth have refused to release him, or cease their tortures.  Now, with the rise of ISIS (Islamic State of Iraq and Syria), a new danger has arisen: assassination by this, the most extreme of the Muslim groups currently plaguing the planet.



From the American Center for Law and Justice, the group which has taken the most consistent and heroic stand on Saeed's behalf, comes the following.  There are numerous worthwhile links in the story, so follow your cursor: the video by Saeed's children is in the next to last paragraph.

Brutal ISIS militants are issuing death threats against American Pastor Saeed Abedini from within the Iranian prison.

The same barbaric jihadists that are perpetrating mass genocide against Christians in Iraq are now targeting Pastor Saeed because he is a Christian and an American.

ISIS militants imprisoned in the same ward of Rajai Shahr prison as Pastor Saeed have communicated through other prisoners that they will kill him because of his Christian faith.

Pastor Saeed told family members this week that he fears for his life after these terrorists said they would murder him.

Though the ISIS terrorists are held in a separate section of the prison ward, they have on several occasions made their way by Pastor Saeed’s section on their way back from the prison yard, forcing Pastor Saeed to hide.

Pastor Saeed could also come face-to-face with these violent terrorists in the prison yard during the prisoners’ one-hour exercise period outdoors.  Pastor Saeed has been forced to remain in his cell and refuse to use his allotted time in the prison yard.

Not only have ISIS militants from Iraq made these new death threats against Pastor Saeed, al Qaeda terrorists imprisoned there have also threatened his life.

On past occasions, al Qaeda members have attempted to attack Pastor Saeed in the prison yard, saved only by other prisoners from his section who placed themselves between Pastor Saeed and the extremists.

The ISIS threats against Pastor Saeed are extremely dangerous.  ISIS is a brutally violent offshoot of al Qaeda in Iraq, proving themselves far more violent than even al Qaeda itself.  ISIS is terrorizing and massacring Christians throughout Iraq and Syria.  Killing Pastor Saeed within Iran, which has publicly opposed ISIS, would provide a monumental victory for these murderous terrorists.

Pastor Saeed’s life is grave danger.

He is now essentially a prisoner within his own prison cell.

President Obama and Secretary of State Kerry must take immediate action to ensure that Pastor Saeed – a U.S. citizen – is protected and brought safely home without delay.

Iran, too, must ensure the safety of Pastor Saeed who it has wrongfully convicted and sentenced to 8 years in prison for his Christian faith – subjecting him now to intense death threats from terrorists.
  
Now is the time to release this man, who has done nothing wrong, and allow him to return to the loving arms of his wife and children here in America.

September 26th will mark two years since the 34-year-old Pastor Saeed was imprisoned.  On that day, thousands across the globe will participate in worldwide prayer vigils in hundreds of cities.  Learn more about these prayer vigils here.

But Pastor Saeed needs your prayer and your voice today.  As we continue aggressively fighting for his release, join hundreds of thousands worldwide in calling for his freedom.  Sign the petition for Pastor Saeed’s freedom at BeHeardProject.com.

As Pastor Saeed’s daughter Rebekka asked in a recent video she and her brother made asking President Obama to bring their father home, “Why does our daddy need to be in prison for loving Jesus?”

He doesn’t deserve this.  His family doesn’t deserve this.  But now his life is in extreme danger.  It’s time to bring him home.


Saturday, August 2, 2014

Cross-Examining God

A simple question: do you have a gripe with God?  Do you have a complaint, a grievance against God, or maybe just some questions you think God should answer?  Millions of people do; at one time or another, most of us do, whether we admit it or not.  You suffer a personal tragedy, or observe the suffering in the world, or think that God's revelations of Himself are inadequate, and you think you'd like to ask Him a few hard questions. You think He owes you an explanation, and that He should be cross-examined. But did you know that the day is approaching when you'll be able to do exactly that?
  .... 
This post is not aimed at people who have received Jesus Christ as their personal Saviour, according to John 1:12.  It's not aimed at people who have experienced God's salvation.  It's aimed at those who have rejected Christ, or postponed thinking about Him, because they don't have a very high opinion of God.  If that description fits you, then keep reading: because the day is coming when you'll be able to ask God whatever you want - - - and tell Him exactly what you think.   
...
  
 ...
But it won't be in an earthly courtroom, and it won't be in front of a beautiful blue lake, as pictured above.  The day is coming when you'll meet God face to face .... at what Christians call the Great White Throne Judgment (Revelation 7:9, Revelation 20:11).  This is where you'll see your Creator, and review your life.  (Christians will have been judged earlier, in a different event.)  This is almost a universal concept; the most primitive societies believe in a final judgment, and the sophisticates of Hollywood make comedies about it.  But it will not be an amusing event.
 ...
It won't be amusing at all, because at that time God will pronounce His judgment on you, and your eternal future will be announced.  But before that happens, God's going to give you the chance to question Him.  And all those "stumbling blocks" you've complained about, and all those tragedies and injustices you've experienced or perceived, will be fair game for discussion.  
...
"God!  Why did You create such a sad world?  Why all the disasters?  Why all the suffering?  What's wrong with You, anyway?  Didn't You care about Your creatures?" 
...
"Hey, God!  If You wanted us to believe that Jesus Christ was the only Way to Heaven, why did You allow all those other religions?  Were You trying to confuse us?" 
 ...
"God, why does that old Bible of Yours say it's wrong for me to be gay?  What's wrong with loving somebody?  Aren't You a God of love?  Anyway, I couldn't help it; all the intellectual people said I was born this way!"
.. ...
And, of course, there will be the more personal questions: "God, why did You let my wife die of cancer?  She was the best woman I ever knew!  We had 40 years together, and she was a great Mother and Grandmother!  And to see her waste away and die like that .... I used to believe, God, but I can't anymore!" 
....
The questions are endless ... but God will listen to every one. 

He'll listen, and when you're finished, when you've gotten it all out of your system, He'll answer.  But it might not be the answer you expect, and it certainly won't be an answer you wanted to hear.  Standing there before the Majesty of your Creator, naked as the day you were born (or as naked as Jesus was on the cross), with all the achievements and awards and pride left behind, your preferences will be of no importance.  God listened to you; now you'll listen to God - - - perhaps for the first time in your adult life.
 ....
Someone says, "Wait a minute!  This is a pretty fanciful scenario you've dreamed up!  What's your authority for saying all this?"  Actually, it's not fanciful at all, and I didn't dream it up; my imagination isn't that great.  My authority is God's word, the Bible, in which this scenario has already been played out in the life of one man - - - and promises to be played out in the lives of everyone who hasn't been saved by Jesus Christ.
 ....
The Book of Job is the oldest book in the Bible, having been written nearly two thousand years before the birth of Christ.  (Moses set down the Pentateuch several hundred years later.) In it, Job, one of the most righteous men in the Bible, starts out as a prosperous, well-respected man with a large and loving family .... and, in a test of his faith, everything is taken from him in a matter of days, including his health.  90% of the book is not narrative, but rather the sad musings and complaints of Job, and the "wisdom" of his friends, whose philosophies are inadequate to explain his agonies.  But Job is no whiner, looking for cheap sympathy.  God describes him as "perfect and upright" (which you and I are not), but he loses all of his children, his fortune, and his health for no apparent reason at all.  If anyone had a reason to question God, it was Job: and question Him he did, at length. 
....
....
At one point, lamenting God's silence in the face of all his agony, Job cries out: Oh that I knew where I might find him! that I might come even to his seat! I would order my cause before him, and fill my mouth with arguments. I would know the words which he would answer me, and understand what he would say unto me. Will he plead against me with his great power? No; but he would put strength in me. There the righteous might dispute with him; so should I be delivered for ever from my judge (Job 23:3-7). Job had a gripe, and a valid one; he wanted to ask God a few questions, and cross-examine Him.  "Surely," he thought, "God will come around to seeing it my way..." 
   ...
That's what most people want: a chance to confront God, and get their questions answered.  Then they might deign to believe on His Son Jesus Christ, and submit to Him.  But first, they - - - you? - - - want God to explain Himself.  
  .....
The laments of Job, and the arguments of his friends, go on for many chapters.  But eventually, when Job has said everything he can think to say, God answers.  And, when you ask God your questions, about the suffering in the world, or your own tragedies, or what a "good life" you've lived, God might answer you as He answered Job.
  ....
Then the LORD answered Job out of the whirlwind, and said, Who is this that darkeneth counsel by words without knowledge? Gird up now thy loins like a man; for I will demand of thee, and answer thou me (Job 38:1-3). 
 .... 
Uh-oh.  This wasn't quite was Job was expecting.  But God had heard him out, just as He'll hear you out, and He'll answer as He chooses.  He says, essentially, "You've got questions for Me?  I have some questions for you, too."  But this isn't some high school debater trying to dodge the subject; this is the Creator of the universe speaking.  Job has been talking, off and on, for 37 chapters, about his own innermost thoughts; and God calls his reflections words without knowledge.  Well, Job certainly had plenty of knowledge about his own misery; but he was, like most of us, looking at it from a self-centered position.  That's natural.  But God sees far beyond that, knows far beyond that, and isn't bound by the "natural:" He knows the end from the beginning. 
 ....
Throughout the next four chapters, God asks Job a series of questions that no man could possibly answer; there are 35 questions in chapter 38 alone.  (I won't print them all in this post, but if anyone thinks that he or she is somehow "smarter than God," then chapters 38 - 41 should be read, and read carefully.  Incidentally, some of these questions, such as that in Job 38:19, implied scientific knowledge that was millennia before its time; but that's the subject for another post.) Imagine standing naked before your Creator, and having these questions cast in your face.  Or, if you prefer, don't imagine: just wait for the day when it happens - - - which could be tomorrow, or fifty years from now. 
 ...
Where wast thou when I laid the foundations of the earth? declare, if thou hast understanding (Job 38:4). Well, that's the easiest question of the lot: Job was nowhere.  You and I were nowhere.  Adam and Eve were nowhere.  But that part about "the foundations of the earth" might get tricky: shall we send for a geologist?  No, he or she wasn't there, either....
... 
Who hath laid the measures thereof, if thou knowest?  Of course Job didn't know.  Is God being sarcastic?  Yes, I believe He is - - - and He has a right to be. 
  .... or who hath stretched the line upon it?
Hast thou perceived the breadth of the earth? declare if thou knowest it all. Yes, God is being a bit sarcastic, but for a legitimate reason: He's reminding Job (and us) just Who the Lord of the universe is - - - a lesson which has yet to be learned by the "great minds" of science and philosophy. 
 ...
Where is the way where light dwelleth? and as for darkness, where is the place thereof, That thou shouldest take it to the bound thereof, and that thou shouldest know the paths to the house thereof? Knowest thou it, because thou wast then born? or because the number of thy days is great (Job 38:19-21)? 
 ...
"Do you think you know the secrets of light and darkness because you were around when they were created?  Come on, Job, you're an old man; haven't you learned these things yet?"  (Notice the scientific wording: the way where light dwelleth, not the place.  Whoever wrote this book knew that light is in constant motion, and doesn't stand still.)  Job is beginning to realize that the same God who allowed his sufferings is a Being of such unimaginable power and wisdom that He undoubtedly has reasons for what He does - - - which is the whole point.  God isn't teasing Job; and, at the end of the questioning, God lovingly restores everything Job lost, and more.  But when someone questions God, they (we) had better expect some pretty heavy answers.
  ....
Canst thou lift up thy voice to the clouds, that abundance of waters may cover thee?  Canst thou send lightnings, that they may go, and say unto thee, Here we are? .... Gavest thou the goodly wings unto the peacocks? or wings and feathers unto the ostrich? Which leaveth her eggs in the earth, and warmeth them in dust, And forgetteth that the foot may crush them, or that the wild beast may break them. She is hardened against her young ones, as though they were not hers: her labour is in vain without fear; Because God hath deprived her of wisdom, neither hath he imparted to her understanding. What time she lifteth up herself on high, she scorneth the horse and his rider .... Doth the hawk fly by thy wisdom, and stretch her wings toward the south? Doth the eagle mount up at thy command, and make her nest on high? .... Hast thou an arm like God? or canst thou thunder with a voice like him? Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency; and array thyself with glory and beauty. Cast abroad the rage of thy wrath: and behold every one that is proud, and abase him. Look on every one that is proud, and bring him low; and tread down the wicked in their place. Hide them in the dust together; and bind their faces in secret. Then will I also confess unto thee that thine own right hand can save thee. Now God is getting personal.  Job's sin was self-righteousness; but God says, "I'll admit that you can save yourself, when you can equal My power and glory." 
 .... 
There's much more than these few selected verses, of course.  But they serve as a reminder, or perhaps a question: are you sure you want to cross-examine God?  Do you really think your arguments and complaints will stand up against His wisdom?  
....  . 
This "cross-examination" of God is what Paul refers to, in Romans 3:19, 26: Now we know that what things soever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law: that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God ... To declare, I say, at this time his righteousness: that he might be just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus.  At the Great White Throne, it will be demonstrated for all eternity Who is "just," and who is "unjust."  The mouths of God's accusers will be stopped: and then an unbeliever's sins will be revealed, and contrasted with God's righteousness.  And, at that point, every knee shall bow to me, and every tongue shall confess to God (Romans 14:11). And you will say "Amen" to your own damnation. 
....
girl crying

But, for good or ill, you'll get your chance to speak.  God won't send you to Hell without giving you a chance to defend yourself ... if you have the wit to do so, which you don't.  In any case, the Great White Throne Judgment will not be a place of "deciding your fate."  Unless you've received Jesus Christ, your fate has been decided already. You might think God was "mean" in the way He treated Job, and the way He answered him.  So, let's see what "gentle Jesus, meek and mild" has to say: For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have everlasting life. For God sent not his Son into the world to condemn the world; but that the world through him might be saved. He that believeth on him is not condemned: but he that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God. (John 3:16-18). You're not waiting on the verdict; you're waiting for the sentence to be carried out.
....
But, as I said at the beginning, this doesn't apply to believers in Jesus Christ, who have been born again, at a specific point in time, by an act of the will.  For us, there will be a separate Judgment, but it will not determine Heaven or Hell for us.  It will determine our rewards, or lack of rewards, in Heaven.  This is "the Judgment Seat of Christ," and deserves a post of its own.
 ....
In the meantime, you may be having second thoughts about wanting to "cross-examine" God.  The plain fact, as stated above, is that one day, every man or woman ever born will bow the knee to Jesus Christ, and proclaim that He's Lord.  For those at the Great White Throne, it will be too late to do them any good, but Muhammad and Marx and Joseph Smith and Gautama Siddhartha, and you and I, will bow the knee.  Why not do it now, while time is on your side?  Those of us who have received Christ, through no merit of our own, have already bowed the knee: and will be pleased to do it as often as possible, throughout eternity.  

What's stopping you?

Sunday, July 27, 2014

God knows us completely

Thou hast set our iniquities before thee, our secret 
sins in the light of thy countenance (Psalm 90:8).

In the divine omniscience we see set forth against each other the terror and fascination of the Godhead. That God knows each person through and through can be a cause of shaking fear to the man that has something to hide - - - some unforsaken sin, some secret crime committed against man or God. The unblessed soul may well tremble that God knows the flimsiness of every pretext and never accepts the poor excuses given for sinful conduct, since He knows perfectly the real reason for it. Thou hast set our iniquities before thee, our secret sins in the light of thy countenance (Psalm 90:8). How frightful a thing to see the sons of Adam seeking to hide among the trees of another garden. But where shall they hide? Whither shall I go from thy spirit? Or whither shall I flee from thy presence? ... If I say, Surely the darkness shall cover me; even the night shall be light about me. Yea, the darkness hideth not from thee; but the night shineth as the day: the darkness and the light are both alike to thee (Psalm 139:7, 12, 12).

And to us who have fled for refuge to lay hold upon the hope that is set before us in the gospel, how unutterably sweet is the knowledge that our Heavenly Father knows us completely. No talebearer can inform on us, no enemy can make an accusation stick; no forgotten skeleton can come tumbling out of some bidden closet to abash us and expose our past; no unsuspected weakness in our characters can come to light to turn God away from us, since He knew us utterly before we knew Him and called us to Himself in the full knowledge of everything that was against us. For the mountains shall depart, and the hills be removed; but my kindness shall not depart from thee, neither shall the covenant of my peace be removed, saith the Lord that hath mercy on thee (Isaiah 54:10).


- - - A. W. Tozer 

 

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Meriam Ibrahim freed, leaves Sudan

Finally.  After months of torture, cat and mouse games, a false "release," and a truly international outpouring of support from the world's Christian community, Meriam Ibrahim and her family have left Sudan and landed safely in Rome, Italy.  Their long, unimaginable ordeal at the hands of the followers of Muhammad is over.  Praise God!


Excerpted from The Telegraph:

By Josephine McKenna, Rome and Hannah Strange
9:15AM BST 24 Jul 2014
© Copyright of Telegraph Media Group Limited 2014


Meriam Ibrahim, the Christian woman who was spared a death sentence for apostasy and then barred from leaving Sudan, met Pope Francis on Thursday after arriving in Rome to jubilant scenes following intense international efforts to free her ....

The 27-year-old was flown to Italy in a government aircraft and landed at Rome’s Ciampino airport accompanied by her family and Italy's deputy minister for foreign affairs, Lapo Pistelli, who flew to Sudan to collect her late on Wednesday. 

"Today we are happy, this is a day of celebration,” Prime Minister Matteo Renzi said as he greeted Ms Ibrahim and her family with his wife Agnese. 

“This gesture by Sudan is testimony to the friendship between our country and Italy’s choice to be a protagonist in this event,” said Mr Pistelli. 

Mr Pistelli first met Ms Ibrahim two weeks ago at the US Embassy in Khartoum where she and her family had sought refuge after a failed attempt to go to the US. 

He said her passport was only returned to her at the embassy on Wednesday afternoon and she was informed she could leave with her children. 

"While we were doing the final procedures she did not even know if she would be able to go,” he said.
Mr Pistelli, left Italy at 6.45 pm on Wednesday night to collect Ms Ibrahim and told journalists today she and her two children were in excellent health. 

The deputy minister said Pope Francis had expressed “his gratitude and joy” when he was informed of Ms Ibrahim’s arrival. The Vatican confirmed that she and her family would meet the pontiff, most likely on Thursday afternoon, before they transferred to the US in a few days. 


Ms Ibrahim had been trapped in Sudan since her release from prison where she was awaiting execution by hanging for refusing to renounce Christianity. 

She gave birth shackled in a Khartoum jail cell in May after her Muslim father claimed she had abandoned Islam and committed adultery with her Christian husband, as mixed-faith marriages are not recognised in Sudanese courts. 

She however insisted that she was raised a Christian by her Ethiopian Orthodox mother after her father left them when she was a young child. 

The case drew international outrage and the country's Supreme Court threw out the death sentence in June. 

Ms Ibrahim's previous attempt to leave the country with her husband Daniel Wani, an American citizen, days after her release from prison was thwarted by the authorities because they said she had "fake" documents, a claim she denied. 
 
We praise God for His mercy, and for answering the prayers of His people in this case.  Of particular note were the efforts of such groups as the American Center for Law and Justice, Amnesty International, and many others.  The Italian government took the initiative in actually doing something while the American Department of State merely whimpered some perfunctory protests. Although the Pope of Rome was, of course, front and center to bask in the spotlight, Meriam's family are not Roman Catholics, and there is no compelling evidence that the Vatican made any significant efforts to help them.

Soon, they will be back on American soil, where Meriam's disabled husband (and therefore their children) are American citizens.  We cannot praise God enough, and we continue to remember such imprisoned brethren as Saeed Abedini and Asia Bibi.  Christians will always be persecuted, but the monstrous "religion" of Islam is currently taking the lead in this.

See also:
Meriam Ibrahim: Sadism in the Sudan

Thursday, July 17, 2014

Flunking the Israel Test

Here's an interesting presentation which open-minded people should find very thought-provoking. A brief snippet of the ideas contained in his book The Israel Test, it is presented by George Gilder, whose 1981 runaway bestseller Wealth and Poverty revolutionized economic thinking in the United States:

video

Sadly but inevitably, it is all to evident how our "Palestinian" friends fare on this test.  They make their deepest feelings (perhaps their only genuine feelings) very clear:

video

Some people simply don't like the truth.